magic weekend day 1

26th July, Glasgow Cottier Theatre1997

The Magic Weekend was an attempt to fill in the gig-free summer months and for that it succeeded. Future Pilot AKA, playing a rare gig, were first on. The tape starts and the band follow. Sushil Dade, formerly with the rather more commercially-minded Soup Dragons, is the main man in this rather experimental project. He's backed by another guitarist and two sax players plus percussion-  
     

ist, plus tape recorder. Rhythms are largely eastern in influence, vocals are few and far between. The tape runs out signalling the end of the set.

Cornershop, in common with the previous act are also playing a rare gig in these parts and it's immediately clear that a large part of the sold out audience have come to see them. The other rather obvious (some might say lazy) comparison is the Indian influences - Cornershop have come a long way from their Ford Cortina days. In fact Tjinder is the only member of the band left who, well, might as well say it, isn't white, though in fact he concentrates on guitar leaving the less rock'n'roll instruments such as sitar and tamboura to Ben and the others. The overall effect is a swirling rather trancey (ahem) vibe which gets the audience on their feet. The response to an extended Julander Shere is pretty much raptureous.

 

Yo La Tengo are also treated as homecoming heroes. Ping-pong tables long since packed away, the band

   

get a pretty good reception from the audience, though they don't really reciprocate. They have 9 albums worth of material to get through of course and this means that the new one 'I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One' only has a few tracks featured. As ever they

switch between a massive variety of styles,

 
       
with Georgia's vocals sounding great in some of their more subdued works. However, Ira seems determined to thrash the living daylights out of his guitar tonight, and the sound doesn't seem to be up to it, giving the effect of the band playing in a padded cell. Perhaps disgruntled, they leave after 45 minutes and despite the best efforts of the audience, there seems little prospect of an encore, until that is, Steven Pastel appears onstage and starts off Speeding Motorcycle'. The band have little option other than to follow him onstage and work through what the hardcore fans (Steven included, presumably) were waiting for .
             
                   

                             

the magic weekend day 2

- Glasgow Cottier Theatre

27th July

                     
         
   
             

version. Aptly, Alun's mike went live during the set, which made for an edgy performance on his part, but the crowd loved it all, including the 4 numbers previously only heard on their recent John Peel session.

 

The Pastels are great. The Pastels played great. I'm too young for 'C86' to mean anything to me, so I don't have the same problem the NME seems to have - unable to see past a band's image from over a decade ago. They aren't the same band. They've been saying recently how in the past they

Belle and Sebastian played a surprise set. They played very early though, so for the rest of the night the air was punctuated with cries of "fuck's sake!" from all the folks who came along fashionably late. Stuart David was wearing the most ridiculous pair of schoolboy shorts and jiggled about onstage like he needed to go to the toilet, but he still managed to have the whole crowd watching his every move with reverential awe. Minly new material from the band, while Monica's vocals were taken over by Stevie Jackson

 

Dump were down to just James McNew plus some hired help, as the other YLT's had flown home. This was something of a homecoming for Dump too, as they have contributed to Vesuvius Records "Driving Companion' in the past.

       
             
The Delgados were excellent as usual. "Pull The Wires From The Wall" was attempted electrically for the first time live and it sounded *almost* as good as the acoustic  
                     

may have taken pride in the fact that they couldn't play their instruments, but now they want to play as well as they possibly can - and it shows. Top flight entertainment for all ages, including those who CAN remember 1986. Judging by the host of new material previewed tonight, the new lp should be a cracker.

 

Thanks to cub reporter extraordinaire, Claire McCann